Skip to main content
Version: Canary

Command Line Interface

The following is a comprehensive reference of the Redwood CLI. You can get a glimpse of all the commands by scrolling the aside to the right.

The Redwood CLI has two entry-point commands:

  1. redwood (alias rw), which is for developing an application, and
  2. redwood-tools (alias rwt), which is for contributing to the framework.

This document covers the redwood command . For redwood-tools, see Contributing in the Redwood repo.

A Quick Note on Syntax

We use yargs and borrow its syntax here:

yarn redwood generate page <name> [path] --option
  • redwood g page is the command.
  • <name> and [path] are positional arguments.
    • <> denotes a required argument.
    • [] denotes an optional argument.
  • --option is an option.

Every argument and option has a type. Here <name> and [path] are strings and --option is a boolean.

You'll also sometimes see arguments with trailing .. like:

yarn redwood build [side..]

The .. operator indicates that the argument accepts an array of values. See Variadic Positional Arguments.

create redwood-app

Create a Redwood project using the yarn create command:

yarn create redwood-app <project directory> [option]
Arguments & OptionsDescription
project directorySpecify the project directory [Required]
--yarn-installEnables the yarn install step and version-requirement checks. You can pass --no-yarn-install to disable this behavior
--typescript, --tsGenerate a TypeScript project. JavaScript by default
--overwriteCreate the project even if the specified project directory isn't empty
--no-telemetryDisable sending telemetry events for this create command and all Redwood CLI commands: https://telemetry.redwoodjs.com
--yarn1Use yarn 1 instead of yarn 3
--git-init, --gitInitialize a git repo during the install process, disabled by default

If you run into trouble during the yarn install step, which may happen if you're developing on an external drive and in other miscellaneous scenarios, try the --yarn1 flag:

yarn create redwood-app my-redwood-project --yarn1

build

Build for production.

yarn redwood build [side..]

We use Babel to transpile the api side into ./api/dist and Webpack to package the web side into ./web/dist.

Arguments & OptionsDescription
sideWhich side(s) to build. Choices are api and web. Defaults to api and web
--statsUse Webpack Bundle Analyzer to visualize the size of Webpack output files via an interactive zoomable treemap
--verbose, -vPrint more information while building

Usage

See Builds.

Example

Running yarn redwood build without any arguments generates the Prisma client and builds both sides of your project:

~/redwood-app$ yarn redwood build
yarn run v1.22.4
$ /redwood-app/node_modules/.bin/redwood build
✔ Generating the Prisma client...
✔ Building "api"...
✔ Building "web"...
Done in 17.37s.

Files are output to each side's dist directory:

├── api
│ ├── dist
│ ├── prisma
│ └── src
└── web
├── dist
├── public
└── src

check (alias diagnostics)

Get structural diagnostics for a Redwood project (experimental).

yarn redwood check

Example

~/redwood-app$ yarn redwood check
yarn run v1.22.4
web/src/Routes.js:14:5: error: You must specify a 'notfound' page
web/src/Routes.js:14:19: error: Duplicate Path
web/src/Routes.js:15:19: error: Duplicate Path
web/src/Routes.js:17:40: error: Page component not found
web/src/Routes.js:17:19: error (INVALID_ROUTE_PATH_SYNTAX): Error: Route path contains duplicate parameter: "/{id}/{id}"

console (alias c)

Launch an interactive Redwood shell (experimental):

  • This has not yet been tested on Windows.
  • The Prisma Client must be generated prior to running this command, e.g. yarn redwood prisma generate. This is a known issue.
yarn redwood console

Right now, you can only use the Redwood console to interact with your database:

Example

~/redwood-app$ yarn redwood console
yarn run v1.22.4
> await db.user.findMany()
> [ { id: 1, email: 'tom@redwoodjs.com', name: 'Tom' } ]

dataMigrate

Data migration tools.

yarn redwood dataMigrate <command>
CommandDescription
installAppends DataMigration model to schema.prisma, creates api/db/dataMigrations directory
upExecutes outstanding data migrations

dataMigrate install

  • Appends a DataMigration model to schema.prisma for tracking which data migrations have already run.
  • Creates a DB migration using yarn redwood prisma migrate dev --create-only create_data_migrations.
  • Creates api/db/dataMigrations directory to contain data migration scripts
yarn redwood dataMigrate install

dataMigrate up

Executes outstanding data migrations against the database. Compares the list of files in api/db/dataMigrations to the records in the DataMigration table in the database and executes any files not present.

If an error occurs during script execution, any remaining scripts are skipped and console output will let you know the error and how many subsequent scripts were skipped.

yarn redwood dataMigrate up

dev

Start development servers for api and web.

yarn redwood dev [side..]

yarn redwood dev api starts the Redwood dev server and yarn redwood dev web starts the Webpack dev server with Redwood's config.

ArgumentDescription
sideWhich dev server(s) to start. Choices are api and web. Defaults to api and web
--forward, --fwdString of one or more Webpack Dev Server config options. See example usage below. See the Redwood Webpack Doc for more details and examples.

Usage

If you're only working on your sdl and services, you can run just the api server to get GraphQL Playground on port 8911:

~/redwood-app$ yarn redwood dev api
yarn run v1.22.4
$ /redwood-app/node_modules/.bin/redwood dev api
$ /redwood-app/node_modules/.bin/dev-server
15:04:51 api | Listening on http://localhost:8911
15:04:51 api | Watching /home/dominic/projects/redwood/redwood-app/api
15:04:51 api |
15:04:51 api | Now serving
15:04:51 api |
15:04:51 api | ► http://localhost:8911/graphql/

Using --forward (alias --fwd), you can pass one or more Webpack Dev Server config options. The following will run the dev server, set the port to 1234, and disable automatic browser opening.

~/redwood-app$ yarn redwood dev --fwd="--port=1234 --open=false"

You may need to access your dev application from a different host, like your mobile device or an SSH tunnel. To resolve the “Invalid Host Header” message, run the following:

~/redwood-app$ yarn redwood dev --fwd="--allowed-hosts all"

For the full list of Webpack Dev Server settings, see this documentation.

For the full list of Server Configuration settings, see this documentation.

deploy

Deploy your redwood project to a hosting provider target.

Netlify, Vercel, and Render

For hosting providers that auto deploy from Git, the deploy command runs the set of steps to build, apply production DB changes, and apply data migrations. In this context, it is often referred to as a Build Command. Note: for Render, which uses traditional infrastructure, the command also starts Redwood's api server.

AWS

This command runs the steps to both build your project and deploy it to AWS.

yarn redwood deploy <target>
CommandsDescription
serverless Deploy to AWS using Serverless framework
netlify [...commands]Build command for Netlify deploy
render <side> [...commands]Build command for Render deploy
vercel [...commands]Build command for Vercel deploy

deploy serverless

Deploy to AWS CloudFront and Lambda using Serverless framework

yarn redwood deploy serverless
Options & ArgumentsDescription
--sidewhich Side(s)to deploy [choices: "api", "web"][default: "web","api"]
--stageserverless stage, see serverless stage docs [default: "production"]
--pack-onlyOnly package the build for deployment
--first-runUse this flag the first time you deploy. The first deploy wizard will walk you through configuring your web side to connect to the api side

deploy netlify

Build command for Netlify deploy

yarn redwood deploy netlify
OptionsDescription
--buildBuild for production [default: "true"]
--prismaApply database migrations [default: "true"]
--data-migrate, --dmMigrate the data in your database [default: "true"]

Example The following command will build, apply Prisma DB migrations, and skip data migrations.

yarn redwood deploy netlify --no-data-migrate
caution

While you may be tempted to use the Netlify CLI commands to build and deploy your project directly from you local project directory, doing so will lead to errors when deploying and/or when running functions. I.e. errors in the function needed for the GraphQL server, but also other serverless functions.

The main reason for this is that these Netlify CLI commands simply build and deploy -- they build your project locally and then push the dist folder. That means that when building a RedwoodJS project, the Prisma client is generated with binaries matching the operating system at build time -- and not the OS compatible with running functions on Netlify. Your Prisma client engine may be darwin for OSX or windows for Windows, but it needs to be debian-openssl-1.1.x or rhel-openssl-1.1.x. If the client is incompatible, your functions will fail.

Therefore, please follow the instructions in the Tutorial to sync your GitHub (or other compatible source control service) repository with Netlify and allow their build and deploy system to manage deployments.

The Netlify CLI still works well for linking your project to your site, testing local builds and also using their dev or dev --live to share your local dev server via a tunnel.

deploy render

Build (web) and Start (api) command for Render deploy. (For usage instructions, see the Render Deploy Redwood doc.)

yarn redwood deploy render <side>
Options & ArgumentsDescription
sideselect side to build [choices: "api", "web"]
--prismaApply database migrations [default: "true"]
--data-migrate, --dmMigrate the data in your database [default: "true"]
--serveRun server for api in production [default: "true"]

Example The following command will build the Web side for static-site CDN deployment.

yarn redwood deploy render web

The following command will apply Prisma DB migrations, run data migrations, and start the api server.

yarn redwood deploy render api

deploy vercel

Build command for Vercel deploy

yarn redwood deploy vercel
OptionsDescription
--buildBuild for production [default: "true"]
--prismaApply database migrations [default: "true"]
--data-migrate, --dmMigrate the data in your database [default: "true"]

Example The following command will build, apply Prisma DB migrations, and skip data migrations.

yarn redwood deploy vercel --no-data-migrate

destroy (alias d)

Rollback changes made by the generate command.

yarn redwood destroy <type>
CommandDescription
cell <name>Destroy a cell component
component <name>Destroy a component
function <name>Destroy a Function
layout <name>Destroy a layout component
page <name> [path]Destroy a page and route component
scaffold <model>Destroy pages, SDL, and Services files based on a given DB schema Model
sdl <model>Destroy a GraphQL schema and service component based on a given DB schema Model
service <name>Destroy a service component
directive <name>Destroy a directive
graphiqlDestroy a generated graphiql file

exec

Execute scripts generated by yarn redwood generate script <name> to run one-off operations, long-running jobs, or utility scripts.

Usage

You can pass any flags to the command and use them within your script:

❯ yarn redwood exec syncStripeProducts foo --firstParam 'hello' --two 'world'

[18:13:56] Generating Prisma client [started]
[18:13:57] Generating Prisma client [completed]
[18:13:57] Running script [started]
:: Executing script with args ::
{ _: [ 'exec', 'foo' ], firstParam: 'hello', two: 'world', '$0': 'rw' }
[18:13:58] Running script [completed]
✨ Done in 4.37s.

Examples of CLI scripts:

  • One-off scripts—such as syncing your Stripe products to your database
  • A background worker you can off-load long running tasks
  • Custom seed scripts for your application during development

See this how to for an example of using exec to run a background worker.

generate (alias g)

Save time by generating boilerplate code.

yarn redwood generate <type>

Some generators require that their argument be a model in your schema.prisma. When they do, their argument is named <model>.

CommandDescription
cell <name>Generate a cell component
component <name>Generate a component component
dataMigration <name>Generate a data migration component
dbAuthGenerate sign in, sign up and password reset pages for dbAuth
deploy <provider>Generate a deployment configuration
function <name>Generate a Function
layout <name>Generate a layout component
page <name> [path]Generate a page component
scaffold <model>Generate Pages, SDL, and Services files based on a given DB schema Model. Also accepts <path/model>
sdl <model>Generate a GraphQL schema and service object
secretGenerate a secret key using a cryptographically-secure source of entropy
service <name>Generate a service component
typesGenerate types and supplementary code
script <name>Generate a script that can use your services/libs to execute with redwood exec script <name>

TypeScript generators

If your project is configured for TypeScript (see the TypeScript docs), the generators will automatically detect and generate .ts/.tsx files for you

Undoing a Generator with a Destroyer

Most generate commands (i.e., everything but yarn redwood generate dataMigration) can be undone by their corresponding destroy command. For example, yarn redwood generate cell can be undone with yarn redwood destroy cell.

generate cell

Generate a cell component.

yarn redwood generate cell <name>

Cells are signature to Redwood. We think they provide a simpler and more declarative approach to data fetching.

Arguments & OptionsDescription
nameName of the cell
--force, -fOverwrite existing files
--typescript, --tsGenerate TypeScript files Enabled by default if we detect your project is TypeScript
--queryUse this flag to specify a specific name for the GraphQL query. The query name must be unique
--listUse this flag to generate a list cell. This flag is needed when dealing with irregular words whose plural and singular is identical such as equipment or pokemon
--testsGenerate test files [default: true]
--storiesGenerate Storybook files [default: true]

Usage

The cell generator supports both single items and lists. See the Single Item Cell vs List Cell section of the Cell documentation.

See the Cells section of the Tutorial for usage examples.

Destroying

yarn redwood destroy cell <name>

Example

Generating a user cell:

~/redwood-app$ yarn redwood generate cell user
yarn run v1.22.4
$ /redwood-app/node_modules/.bin/redwood g cell user
✔ Generating cell files...
✔ Writing `./web/src/components/UserCell/UserCell.test.js`...
✔ Writing `./web/src/components/UserCell/UserCell.js`...
Done in 1.00s.

A cell defines and exports four constants: QUERY, Loading, Empty, Failure, and Success:

./web/src/components/UserCell/UserCell.js
export const QUERY = gql`
query {
user {
id
}
}
`

export const Loading = () => <div>Loading...</div>

export const Empty = () => <div>Empty</div>

export const Failure = ({ error }) => <div>Error: {error.message}</div>

export const Success = ({ user }) => {
return JSON.stringify(user)
}

generate component

Generate a component.

yarn redwood generate component <name>

Redwood loves function components and makes extensive use of React Hooks, which are only enabled in function components.

Arguments & OptionsDescription
nameName of the component
--force, -fOverwrite existing files
--typescript, --tsGenerate TypeScript files Enabled by default if we detect your project is TypeScript
--testsGenerate test files [default: true]
--storiesGenerate Storybook files [default: true]

Destroying

yarn redwood destroy component <name>

Example

Generating a user component:

~/redwood-app$ yarn redwood generate component user
yarn run v1.22.4
$ /redwood-app/node_modules/.bin/redwood g component user
✔ Generating component files...
✔ Writing `./web/src/components/User/User.test.js`...
✔ Writing `./web/src/components/User/User.js`...
Done in 1.02s.

The component will export some jsx telling you where to find it.

./web/src/components/User/User.js
const User = () => {
return (
<div>
<h2>{'User'}</h2>
<p>{'Find me in ./web/src/components/User/User.js'}</p>
</div>
)
}

export default User

generate dataMigration

Generate a data migration script.

yarn redwood generate dataMigration <name>

Creates a data migration script in api/db/dataMigrations.

Arguments & OptionsDescription
nameName of the data migration, prefixed with a timestamp at generation time

Usage

See the Data Migration docs.

Usage

See the Deploy docs.

generate dbAuth

Generate log in, sign up, forgot password and password reset pages for dbAuth

yarn redwood generate dbAuth
Arguments & OptionsDescription
--webAuthnWhether or not to add webAuthn support to the log in page. If not specified you will be prompted

If you don't want to create your own log in, sign up, forgot password and password reset pages from scratch you can use this generator. The pages will be available at /login, /signup, /forgot-password, and /reset-password. Check the post-install instructions for one change you need to make to those pages: where to redirect the user to once their log in/sign up is successful.

If you'd rather create your own, you might want to start from the generated pages anyway as they'll contain the other code you need to actually submit the log in credentials or sign up fields to the server for processing.

generate directive

Generate a directive.

yarn redwood generate directive <name>
Arguments & OptionsDescription
nameName of the directive
--force, -fOverwrite existing files
--typescript, --tsGenerate TypeScript files (defaults to your projects language target)
--typeDirective type [Choices: "validator", "transformer"]

Usage

See Redwood Directives.

Destroying

yarn redwood destroy directive <name>

Example

Generating a myDirective directive using the interactive command:

yarn rw g directive myDirective

? What type of directive would you like to generate? › - Use arrow-keys. Return to submit.
❯ Validator - Implement a validation: throw an error if criteria not met to stop execution
Transformer - Modify values of fields or query responses

generate function

Generate a Function.

yarn redwood generate function <name>

Not to be confused with Javascript functions, Capital-F Functions are meant to be deployed to serverless endpoints like AWS Lambda.

Arguments & OptionsDescription
nameName of the function
--force, -fOverwrite existing files
--typescript, --tsGenerate TypeScript files Enabled by default if we detect your project is TypeScript

Usage

See the Custom Function how to.

Destroying

yarn redwood destroy function <name>

Example

Generating a user function:

~/redwood-app$ yarn redwood generate function user
yarn run v1.22.4
$ /redwood-app/node_modules/.bin/redwood g function user
✔ Generating function files...
✔ Writing `./api/src/functions/user.js`...
Done in 16.04s.

Functions get passed context which provides access to things like the current user:

./api/src/functions/user.js
export const handler = async (event, context) => {
return {
statusCode: 200,
body: `user function`,
}
}

Now if we run yarn redwood dev api:

~/redwood-app$ yarn redwood dev api
yarn run v1.22.4
$ /redwood-app/node_modules/.bin/redwood dev api
$ /redwood-app/node_modules/.bin/dev-server
17:21:49 api | Listening on http://localhost:8911
17:21:49 api | Watching /home/dominic/projects/redwood/redwood-app/api
17:21:49 api |
17:21:49 api | Now serving
17:21:49 api |
17:21:49 api | ► http://localhost:8911/graphql/
17:21:49 api | ► http://localhost:8911/user/

generate layout

Generate a layout component.

yarn redwood generate layout <name>

Layouts wrap pages and help you stay DRY.

Arguments & OptionsDescription
nameName of the layout
--force, -fOverwrite existing files
--typescript, --tsGenerate TypeScript files Enabled by default if we detect your project is TypeScript
--testsGenerate test files [default: true]
--storiesGenerate Storybook files [default: true]
--skipLinkGenerate a layout with a skip link [default: false]

Usage

See the Layouts section of the tutorial.

Destroying

yarn redwood destroy layout <name>

Example

Generating a user layout:

~/redwood-app$ yarn redwood generate layout user
yarn run v1.22.4
$ /redwood-app/node_modules/.bin/redwood g layout user
✔ Generating layout files...
✔ Writing `./web/src/layouts/UserLayout/UserLayout.test.js`...
✔ Writing `./web/src/layouts/UserLayout/UserLayout.js`...
Done in 1.00s.

A layout will just export it's children:

./web/src/layouts/UserLayout/UserLayout.test.js
const UserLayout = ({ children }) => {
return <>{children}</>
}

export default UserLayout

generate model

Generate a RedwoodRecord model.

yarn redwood generate model <name>
Arguments & OptionsDescription
nameName of the model (in schema.prisma)
--force, -fOverwrite existing files

Usage

See the RedwoodRecord docs.

Example

~/redwood-app$ yarn redwood generate model User
yarn run v1.22.4
$ /redwood-app/node_modules/.bin/redwood g model User
✔ Generating model file...
✔ Successfully wrote file `./api/src/models/User.js`
✔ Parsing datamodel, generating api/src/models/index.js...

Wrote /Users/rob/Sites/redwoodjs/redwood_record/.redwood/datamodel.json
Wrote /Users/rob/Sites/redwoodjs/redwood_record/api/src/models/index.js

✨ Done in 3.74s.

Generating a model automatically runs yarn rw record init as well.

generate page

Generates a page component and updates the routes.

yarn redwood generate page <name> [path]

path can include a route parameter which will be passed to the generated page. The syntax for that is /path/to/page/{routeParam}/more/path. You can also specify the type of the route parameter if needed: {routeParam:Int}. If path isn't specified, or if it's just a route parameter, it will be derived from name and the route parameter, if specified, will be added to the end.

This also updates Routes.js in ./web/src.

Arguments & OptionsDescription
nameName of the page
pathURL path to the page. Defaults to name
--force, -fOverwrite existing files
--typescript, --tsGenerate TypeScript files Enabled by default if we detect your project is TypeScript
--testsGenerate test files [default: true]
--storiesGenerate Storybook files [default: true]

Destroying

yarn redwood destroy page <name> [path]

Examples

Generating a home page:

~/redwood-app$ yarn redwood generate page home /
yarn run v1.22.4
$ /redwood-app/node_modules/.bin/redwood g page home /
✔ Generating page files...
✔ Writing `./web/src/pages/HomePage/HomePage.test.js`...
✔ Writing `./web/src/pages/HomePage/HomePage.js`...
✔ Updating routes file...
Done in 1.02s.

The page returns jsx telling you where to find it:

./web/src/pages/HomePage/HomePage.js
const HomePage = () => {
return (
<div>
<h1>HomePage</h1>
<p>Find me in ./web/src/pages/HomePage/HomePage.js</p>
</div>
)
}

export default HomePage

And the route is added to Routes.js:

./web/src/Routes.js
const Routes = () => {
return (
<Router>
<Route path="/" page={HomePage} name="home" />
<Route notfound page={NotFoundPage} />
</Router>
)
}

Generating a page to show quotes:

~/redwood-app$ yarn redwood generate page quote {id}
yarn run v1.22.4
$ /redwood-app/node_modules/.bin/redwood g page quote {id}
✔ Generating page files...
✔ Writing `./web/src/pages/QuotePage/QuotePage.stories.js`...
✔ Writing `./web/src/pages/QuotePage/QuotePage.test.js`...
✔ Writing `./web/src/pages/QuotePage/QuotePage.js`...
✔ Updating routes file...
Done in 1.02s.

The generated page will get the route parameter as a prop:

./web/src/pages/QuotePage/QuotePage.js
import { Link, routes } from '@redwoodjs/router'

const QuotePage = ({ id }) => {
return (
<>
<h1>QuotePage</h1>
<p>Find me in "./web/src/pages/QuotePage/QuotePage.js"</p>
<p>
My default route is named "quote", link to me with `
<Link to={routes.quote({ id: 42 })}>Quote 42</Link>`
</p>
<p>The parameter passed to me is {id}</p>
</>
)
}

export default QuotePage

And the route is added to Routes.js, with the route parameter added:

./web/src/Routes.js
const Routes = () => {
return (
<Router>
<Route path="/quote/{id}" page={QuotePage} name="quote" />
<Route notfound page={NotFoundPage} />
</Router>
)
}

generate scaffold

Generate Pages, SDL, and Services files based on a given DB schema Model. Also accepts <path/model>.

yarn redwood generate scaffold <model>

A scaffold quickly creates a CRUD for a model by generating the following files and corresponding routes:

  • sdl
  • service
  • layout
  • pages
  • cells
  • components

The content of the generated components is different from what you'd get by running them individually.

Arguments & OptionsDescription
modelModel to scaffold. You can also use <path/model> to nest files by type at the given path directory (or directories). For example, redwood g scaffold admin/post
--docsUse or set to true to generated comments in SDL to use in self-documentating your app's GraphQL API. See: Self-Documenting GraphQL API [default:false]
--force, -fOverwrite existing files
--tailwindGenerate TailwindCSS version of scaffold.css (automatically set to true if TailwindCSS config exists)
--typescript, --tsGenerate TypeScript files Enabled by default if we detect your project is TypeScript

Usage

See Creating a Post Editor.

Nesting of Components and Pages

By default, redwood will nest the components and pages in a directory named as per the model. For example (where post is the model): yarn rw g scaffold post will output the following files, with the components and pages nested in a Post directory:

  √ Generating scaffold files...
√ Successfully wrote file `./api/src/graphql/posts.sdl.js`
√ Successfully wrote file `./api/src/services/posts/posts.js`
√ Successfully wrote file `./api/src/services/posts/posts.scenarios.js`
√ Successfully wrote file `./api/src/services/posts/posts.test.js`
√ Successfully wrote file `./web/src/layouts/PostsLayout/PostsLayout.js`
√ Successfully wrote file `./web/src/pages/Post/EditPostPage/EditPostPage.js`
√ Successfully wrote file `./web/src/pages/Post/PostPage/PostPage.js`
√ Successfully wrote file `./web/src/pages/Post/PostsPage/PostsPage.js`
√ Successfully wrote file `./web/src/pages/Post/NewPostPage/NewPostPage.js`
√ Successfully wrote file `./web/src/components/Post/EditPostCell/EditPostCell.js`
√ Successfully wrote file `./web/src/components/Post/Post/Post.js`
√ Successfully wrote file `./web/src/components/Post/PostCell/PostCell.js`
√ Successfully wrote file `./web/src/components/Post/PostForm/PostForm.js`
√ Successfully wrote file `./web/src/components/Post/Posts/Posts.js`
√ Successfully wrote file `./web/src/components/Post/PostsCell/PostsCell.js`
√ Successfully wrote file `./web/src/components/Post/NewPost/NewPost.js`
√ Adding layout import...
√ Adding set import...
√ Adding scaffold routes...
√ Adding scaffold asset imports...

If it is not desired to nest the components and pages, then redwood provides an option that you can set to disable this for your project. Add the following in your redwood.toml file to disable the nesting of components and pages.

[generate]
nestScaffoldByModel = false

Setting the nestScaffoldByModel = true will retain the default behavior, but is not required.

Notes:

  1. The nesting directory is always set to be PascalCase.

Namespacing Scaffolds

You can namespace your scaffolds by providing <path/model>. The layout, pages, cells, and components will be nested in newly created dir(s). In addition, the nesting folder, based upon the model name, is still applied after the path for components and pages, unless turned off in the redwood.toml as described above. For example, given a model user, running yarn redwood generate scaffold admin/user will nest the layout, pages, and components in a newly created Admin directory created for each of the layouts, pages, and components folders:

~/redwood-app$ yarn redwood generate scaffold admin/user
yarn run v1.22.4
$ /redwood-app/node_modules/.bin/redwood g scaffold admin/user
✔ Generating scaffold files...
✔ Successfully wrote file `./api/src/graphql/users.sdl.js`
✔ Successfully wrote file `./api/src/services/users/users.js`
✔ Successfully wrote file `./api/src/services/users/users.scenarios.js`
✔ Successfully wrote file `./api/src/services/users/users.test.js`
✔ Successfully wrote file `./web/src/layouts/Admin/UsersLayout/UsersLayout.js`
✔ Successfully wrote file `./web/src/pages/Admin/User/EditUserPage/EditUserPage.js`
✔ Successfully wrote file `./web/src/pages/Admin/User/UserPage/UserPage.js`
✔ Successfully wrote file `./web/src/pages/Admin/User/UsersPage/UsersPage.js`
✔ Successfully wrote file `./web/src/pages/Admin/User/NewUserPage/NewUserPage.js`
✔ Successfully wrote file `./web/src/components/Admin/User/EditUserCell/EditUserCell.js`
✔ Successfully wrote file `./web/src/components/Admin/User/User/User.js`
✔ Successfully wrote file `./web/src/components/Admin/User/UserCell/UserCell.js`
✔ Successfully wrote file `./web/src/components/Admin/User/UserForm/UserForm.js`
✔ Successfully wrote file `./web/src/components/Admin/User/Users/Users.js`
✔ Successfully wrote file `./web/src/components/Admin/User/UsersCell/UsersCell.js`
✔ Successfully wrote file `./web/src/components/Admin/User/NewUser/NewUser.js`
✔ Adding layout import...
✔ Adding set import...
✔ Adding scaffold routes...
✔ Adding scaffold asset imports...
Done in 1.21s.

The routes wrapped in the Set component with generated layout will be nested too:

./web/src/Routes.js
const Routes = () => {
return (
<Router>
<Set wrap={UsersLayout}>
<Route path="/admin/users/new" page={AdminUserNewUserPage} name="adminNewUser" />
<Route path="/admin/users/{id:Int}/edit" page={AdminUserEditUserPage} name="adminEditUser" />
<Route path="/admin/users/{id:Int}" page={AdminUserUserPage} name="adminUser" />
<Route path="/admin/users" page={AdminUserUsersPage} name="adminUsers" />
</Set>
<Route notfound page={NotFoundPage} />
</Router>
)
}

Notes:

  1. Each directory in the scaffolded path is always set to be PascalCase.
  2. The scaffold path may be multiple directories deep.

Destroying

yarn redwood destroy scaffold <model>

Notes:

  1. You can also use <path/model> to destroy files that were generated under a scaffold path. For example, redwood d scaffold admin/post
  2. The destroy command will remove empty folders along the path, provided they are lower than the folder level of component, layout, page, etc.
  3. The destroy scaffold command will also follow the nestScaffoldbyModel setting in the redwood.toml file. For example, if you have an existing scaffold that you wish to destroy, that does not have the pages and components nested by the model name, you can destroy the scaffold by temporarily setting:
[generate]
nestScaffoldByModel = false

Troubleshooting

If you see Error: Unknown type: ..., don't panic! It's a known limitation with GraphQL type generation. It happens when you generate the SDL of a Prisma model that has relations before the SDL for the related model exists. Please see Troubleshooting Generators for help.

generate script

Generates an arbitrary Node.js script in ./scripts/<name> that can be used with redwood execute command later.

Arguments & OptionsDescription
nameName of the service
--typescript, --tsGenerate TypeScript files Enabled by default if we detect your project is TypeScript

Scripts have access to services and libraries used in your project. Some examples of how this can be useful:

  • create special database seed scripts for different scenarios
  • sync products and prices from your payment provider
  • running cleanup jobs on a regular basis e.g. delete stale/expired data
  • sync data between platforms e.g. email from your db to your email marketing platform

Usage

❯ yarn rw g script syncStripeProducts

✔ Generating script file...
✔ Successfully wrote file `./scripts/syncStripeProducts.ts`
✔ Next steps...

After modifying your script, you can invoke it like:

yarn rw exec syncStripeProducts

yarn rw exec syncStripeProducts --param1 true

generate sdl

Generate a GraphQL schema and service object.

yarn redwood generate sdl <model>

The sdl will inspect your schema.prisma and will do its best with relations. Schema to generators isn't one-to-one yet (and might never be).

Arguments & OptionsDescription
modelModel to generate the sdl for
--crudSet to false, or use --no-crud, if you do not want to generate mutations
--docsUse or set to true to generated comments in SDL to use in self-documentating your app's GraphQL API. See: Self-Documenting GraphQL API [default: false]
--force, -fOverwrite existing files
--testsGenerate service test and scenario [default: true]
--typescript, --tsGenerate TypeScript files Enabled by default if we detect your project is TypeScript

Note: The generated sdl will include the @requireAuth directive by default to ensure queries and mutations are secure. If your app's queries and mutations are all public, you can set up a custom SDL generator template to apply @skipAuth (or a custom validator directive) to suit you application's needs.

Regenerating the SDL

Often, as you iterate on your data model, you may add, remove, or rename fields. You still want Redwood to update the generated SDL and service files for those updates because it saves time not having to make those changes manually.

But, since the generate command prevents you from overwriting files accidentally, you use the --force option -- but a force will reset any test and scenarios you may have written which you don't want to lose.

In that case, you can run the following to "regenerate" just the SDL file and leave your tests and scenarios intact and not lose your hard work.

yarn redwood g sdl <model> --force --no-tests

Example

~/redwood-app$ yarn redwood generate sdl user --force --no-tests
yarn run v1.22.4
$ /redwood-app/node_modules/.bin/redwood g sdl user
✔ Generating SDL files...
✔ Writing `./api/src/graphql/users.sdl.js`...
✔ Writing `./api/src/services/users/users.js`...
Done in 1.04s.

Destroying

yarn redwood destroy sdl <model>

Example

Generating a user sdl:

~/redwood-app$ yarn redwood generate sdl user
yarn run v1.22.4
$ /redwood-app/node_modules/.bin/redwood g sdl user
✔ Generating SDL files...
✔ Writing `./api/src/graphql/users.sdl.js`...
✔ Writing `./api/src/services/users/users.scenarios.js`...
✔ Writing `./api/src/services/users/users.test.js`...
✔ Writing `./api/src/services/users/users.js`...
Done in 1.04s.

The generated sdl defines a corresponding type, query, create/update inputs, and any mutations. To prevent defining mutations, add the --no-crud option.

./api/src/graphql/users.sdl.js
export const schema = gql`
type User {
id: Int!
email: String!
name: String
}

type Query {
users: [User!]! @requireAuth
}

input CreateUserInput {
email: String!
name: String
}

input UpdateUserInput {
email: String
name: String
}

type Mutation {
createUser(input: CreateUserInput!): User! @requireAuth
updateUser(id: Int!, input: UpdateUserInput!): User! @requireAuth
deleteUser(id: Int!): User! @requireAuth
}
`

The services file fulfills the query. If the --no-crud option is added, this file will be less complex.

./api/src/services/users/users.js
import { db } from 'src/lib/db'

export const users = () => {
return db.user.findMany()
}

For a model with a relation, the field will be listed in the sdl:

./api/src/graphql/users.sdl.js
export const schema = gql`
type User {
id: Int!
email: String!
name: String
profile: Profile
}

type Query {
users: [User!]! @requireAuth
}

input CreateUserInput {
email: String!
name: String
}

input UpdateUserInput {
email: String
name: String
}

type Mutation {
createUser(input: CreateUserInput!): User! @requireAuth
updateUser(id: Int!, input: UpdateUserInput!): User! @requireAuth
deleteUser(id: Int!): User! @requireAuth
}
`

And the service will export an object with the relation as a property:

./api/src/services/users/users.js
import { db } from 'src/lib/db'

export const users = () => {
return db.user.findMany()
}

export const User = {
profile: (_obj, { root }) => {
db.user.findUnique({ where: { id: root.id } }).profile(),
}
}

Troubleshooting

If you see Error: Unknown type: ..., don't panic! It's a known limitation with GraphQL type generation. It happens when you generate the SDL of a Prisma model that has relations before the SDL for the related model exists. Please see Troubleshooting Generators for help.

generate secret

Generate a secret key using a cryptographically-secure source of entropy. Commonly used when setting up dbAuth.

Arguments & OptionsDescription
--rawPrint just the key, without any informational text

Usage

Using the --raw option you can easily append a secret key to your .env file, like so:

# yarn v1
echo "SESSION_SECRET=$(yarn --silent rw g secret --raw)" >> .env

# yarn v3
echo "SESSION_SECRET=$(yarn rw g secret --raw)" >> .env

generate service

Generate a service component.

yarn redwood generate service <name>

Services are where Redwood puts its business logic. They can be used by your GraphQL API or any other place in your backend code. See How Redwood Works with Data.

Arguments & OptionsDescription
nameName of the service
--force, -fOverwrite existing files
--typescript, --tsGenerate TypeScript files Enabled by default if we detect your project is TypeScript
--testsGenerate test and scenario files [default: true]

Destroying

yarn redwood destroy service <name>

Example

Generating a user service:

~/redwood-app$ yarn redwood generate service user
yarn run v1.22.4
$ /redwood-app/node_modules/.bin/redwood g service user
✔ Generating service files...
✔ Writing `./api/src/services/users/users.scenarios.js`...
✔ Writing `./api/src/services/users/users.test.js`...
✔ Writing `./api/src/services/users/users.js`...
Done in 1.02s.

The generated service component will export a findMany query:

./api/src/services/users/users.js
import { db } from 'src/lib/db'

export const users = () => {
return db.user.findMany()
}

generate types

Generates supplementary code (project types)

yarn redwood generate types

Usage

~/redwood-app$ yarn redwood generate types
yarn run v1.22.10
$ /redwood-app/node_modules/.bin/redwood g types
$ /redwood-app/node_modules/.bin/rw-gen

Generating...

- .redwood/schema.graphql
- .redwood/types/mirror/api/src/services/posts/index.d.ts
- .redwood/types/mirror/web/src/components/BlogPost/index.d.ts
- .redwood/types/mirror/web/src/layouts/BlogLayout/index.d.ts
...
- .redwood/types/mirror/web/src/components/Post/PostsCell/index.d.ts
- .redwood/types/includes/web-routesPages.d.ts
- .redwood/types/includes/all-currentUser.d.ts
- .redwood/types/includes/web-routerRoutes.d.ts
- .redwood/types/includes/api-globImports.d.ts
- .redwood/types/includes/api-globalContext.d.ts
- .redwood/types/includes/api-scenarios.d.ts
- api/types/graphql.d.ts
- web/types/graphql.d.ts

... and done.

info

Print your system environment information.

yarn redwood info

This command's primarily intended for getting information others might need to know to help you debug:

~/redwood-app$ yarn redwood info
yarn run v1.22.4
$ /redwood-app/node_modules/.bin/redwood info

System:
OS: Linux 5.4 Ubuntu 20.04 LTS (Focal Fossa)
Shell: 5.0.16 - /usr/bin/bash
Binaries:
Node: 13.12.0 - /tmp/yarn--1589998865777-0.9683603763419713/node
Yarn: 1.22.4 - /tmp/yarn--1589998865777-0.9683603763419713/yarn
Browsers:
Chrome: 78.0.3904.108
Firefox: 76.0.1
npmPackages:
@redwoodjs/core: ^0.7.0-rc.3 => 0.7.0-rc.3

Done in 1.98s.

lint

Lint your files.

yarn redwood lint

Our ESLint configuration is a mix of ESLint's recommended rules, React's recommended rules, and a bit of our own stylistic flair:

  • no semicolons
  • comma dangle when multiline
  • single quotes
  • always use parenthesis around arrow functions
  • enforced import sorting
OptionDescription
--fixTry to fix errors

prisma

Run Prisma CLI with experimental features.

yarn redwood prisma

Redwood's prisma command is a lightweight wrapper around the Prisma CLI. It's the primary way you interact with your database.

What do you mean it's a lightweight wrapper?

By lightweight wrapper, we mean that we're handling some flags under the hood for you. You can use the Prisma CLI directly (yarn prisma), but letting Redwood act as a proxy (yarn redwood prisma) saves you a lot of keystrokes. For example, Redwood adds the --preview-feature and --schema=api/db/schema.prisma flags automatically.

If you want to know exactly what yarn redwood prisma <command> runs, which flags it's passing, etc., it's right at the top:

$ yarn redwood prisma migrate dev
yarn run v1.22.10
$ ~/redwood-app/node_modules/.bin/redwood prisma migrate dev
Running prisma cli:
yarn prisma migrate dev --schema "~/redwood-app/api/db/schema.prisma"
...

Since yarn redwood prisma is just an entry point into all the database commands that the Prisma CLI has to offer, we won't try to provide an exhaustive reference of everything you can do with it here. Instead what we'll do is focus on some of the most common commands; those that you'll be running on a regular basis, and how they fit into Redwood's workflows.

For the complete list of commands, see the Prisma CLI Reference. It's the authority.

Along with the CLI reference, bookmark Prisma's Migration Flows docit'll prove to be an invaluable resource for understanding yarn redwood prisma migrate.

CommandDescription
db <command>Manage your database schema and lifecycle during development
generateGenerate artifacts (e.g. Prisma Client)
migrate <command>Update the database schema with migrations

prisma db

Manage your database schema and lifecycle during development.

yarn redwood prisma db <command>

The prisma db namespace contains commands that operate directly against the database.

prisma db pull

Pull the schema from an existing database, updating the Prisma schema.

👉 Quick link to the Prisma CLI Reference.

yarn redwood prisma db pull

This command, formerly introspect, connects to your database and adds Prisma models to your Prisma schema that reflect the current database schema.

Warning: The command will Overwrite the current schema.prisma file with the new schema. Any manual changes or customization will be lost. Be sure to back up your current schema.prisma file before running db pull if it contains important modifications.

prisma db push

Push the state from your Prisma schema to your database.

👉 Quick link to the Prisma CLI Reference.

yarn redwood prisma db push

This is your go-to command for prototyping changes to your Prisma schema (schema.prisma). Prior to to yarn redwood prisma db push, there wasn't a great way to try out changes to your Prisma schema without creating a migration. This command fills the void by "pushing" your schema.prisma file to your database without creating a migration. You don't even have to run yarn redwood prisma generate afterwardit's all taken care of for you, making it ideal for iterative development.

prisma db seed

Seed your database.

👉 Quick link to the Prisma CLI Reference.

yarn redwood prisma db seed

This command seeds your database by running your project's seed.js|ts file which you can find in your scripts directory.

Prisma's got a great seeding guide that covers both the concepts and the nuts and bolts.

Important: Prisma Migrate also triggers seeding in the following scenarios:

  • you manually run the yarn redwood prisma migrate reset command
  • the database is reset interactively in the context of using yarn redwood prisma migrate dev—for example, as a result of migration history conflicts or database schema drift

If you want to use yarn redwood prisma migrate dev or yarn redwood prisma migrate reset without seeding, you can pass the --skip-seed flag.

While having a great seed might not be all that important at the start, as soon as you start collaborating with others, it becomes vital.

How does seeding actually work?

If you look at your project's package.json file, you'll notice a prisma section:

  "prisma": {
"seed": "yarn rw exec seed"
},

Prisma runs any command found in the seed setting when seeding via yarn rw prisma db seed or yarn rw prisma migrate reset. Here we're using the Redwood exec cli command that runs a script.

If you wanted to seed your database using a different method (like psql and an .sql script), you can do so by changing the "seed" script command.

More About Seeding

In addition, you can code along with Ryan Chenkie, and learn how libraries like faker can help you create a large, realistic database fast, especially in tandem with Prisma's createMany.

Log Formatting

If you use the Redwood Logger as part of your seed script, you can pipe the command to the LogFormatter to output prettified logs.

For example, if your scripts.seed.js imports the logger:

scripts/seed.js
import { db } from 'api/src/lib/db'
import { logger } from 'api/src/lib/logger'

export default async () => {
try {
const posts = [
{
title: 'Welcome to the blog!',
body: "I'm baby single- origin coffee kickstarter lo.",
},
{
title: 'A little more about me',
body: 'Raclette shoreditch before they sold out lyft.',
},
{
title: 'What is the meaning of life?',
body: 'Meh waistcoat succulents umami asymmetrical, hoodie post-ironic paleo chillwave tote bag.',
},
]

Promise.all(
posts.map(async (post) => {
const newPost = await db.post.create({
data: { title: post.title, body: post.body },
})

logger.debug({ data: newPost }, 'Added post')
})
)
} catch (error) {
logger.error(error)
}
}

You can pipe the script output to the formatter:

yarn rw prisma db seed | yarn rw-log-formatter

Note: Just be sure to set data attribute, so the formatter recognizes the content. For example: logger.debug({ data: newPost }, 'Added post')

prisma migrate

Update the database schema with migrations.

👉 Quick link to the Prisma Concepts.

yarn redwood prisma migrate <command>

As a database toolkit, Prisma strives to be as holistic as possible. Prisma Migrate lets you use Prisma schema to make changes to your database declaratively, all while keeping things deterministic and fully customizable by generating the migration steps in a simple, familiar format: SQL.

Since migrate generates plain SQL files, you can edit those SQL files before applying the migration using yarn redwood prisma migrate --create-only. This creates the migration based on the changes in the Prisma schema, but doesn't apply it, giving you the chance to go in and make any modifications you want. Daniel Norman's tour of Prisma Migrate demonstrates this and more to great effect.

Prisma Migrate has separate commands for applying migrations based on whether you're in dev or in production. The Prisma Migration flows goes over the difference between these workflows in more detail.

prisma migrate dev

Create a migration from changes in Prisma schema, apply it to the database, trigger generators (e.g. Prisma Client).

👉 Quick link to the Prisma CLI Reference.

yarn redwood prisma migrate dev

prisma migrate deploy

Apply pending migrations to update the database schema in production/staging.

👉 Quick link to the Prisma CLI Reference.

yarn redwood prisma migrate deploy

prisma migrate reset

This command deletes and recreates the database, or performs a "soft reset" by removing all data, tables, indexes, and other artifacts.

It'll also re-seed your database by automatically running the db seed command. See prisma db seed.

Important: For use in development environments only

record

This command is experimental and its behavior may change.

Commands for working with RedwoodRecord.

record init

Parses schema.prisma and caches the datamodel as JSON. Reads relationships between models and adds some configuration in api/src/models/index.js.

yarn rw record init

redwood-tools (alias rwt)

Redwood's companion CLI development tool. You'll be using this if you're contributing to Redwood. See Contributing in the Redwood repo.

setup

Initialize configuration and integrate third-party libraries effortlessly.

yarn redwood setup <category>
CommandsDescription
authSet up auth configuration for a provider
cacheSet up cache configuration for memcached or redis
custom-web-indexSet up an index.js file, so you can customize how Redwood web is mounted in your browser
deploySet up a deployment configuration for a provider
generatorCopy default Redwood generator templates locally for customization
i18nSet up i18n
tsconfigAdd relevant tsconfig so you can start using TypeScript
uiSet up a UI design or style library
webpackSet up a webpack config file in your project so you can add custom config

setup auth

Integrate an auth provider.

yarn redwood setup auth <provider>
Arguments & OptionsDescription
providerAuth provider to configure. Choices are auth0, azureActiveDirectory, clerk, dbAuth, ethereum, firebase, goTrue, magicLink, netlify, nhost, and supabase
--force, -fOverwrite existing configuration

Usage

See Authentication.

setup graphiQL headers

Redwood automatically sets up your authentication headers in your GraphiQL playground. Currently supported auth providers include Supabase, dbAuth, and Netlify.

A generateGraphiQLHeader file will be created in your api/lib folder and included in your gitignore. You can edit this file to customize your header. The function in the file is passed into your createGraphQLHandler and only called in dev.

yarn redwood setup graphiql <provider>
Arguments & OptionsDescription
providerAuth provider to configure. Choices are dbAuth, netlify, and supabase
--id, -iUnique id to identify current user (required only for DBAuth)
--token, -tGenerated JWT token. If not provided, a mock JWT payload is returned in api/lib/generateGraphiQLHeader that can be modified and turned into a token
--expiry, -eToken expiry in minutes. Default is 60
--view, -vPrint out generated headers to console

setup cache

This command creates a setup file in api/src/lib/cache.{ts|js} for connecting to a Memcached or Redis server and allows caching in services. See the Caching section of the Services docs for usage.

yarn redwood setup cache <client>
Arguments & OptionsDescription
clientName of the client to configure, memcached or redis
--force, -fOverwrite existing files

setup custom-web-index

Redwood automatically mounts your <App /> to the DOM, but if you want to customize how that happens, you can use this setup command to generate an index.js file in web/src.

yarn redwood setup custom-web-index
Arguments & OptionsDescription
--force, -fOverwrite existing files

setup generator

Copies a given generator's template files to your local app for customization. The next time you generate that type again, it will use your custom template instead of Redwood's default.

yarn rw setup generator <name>
Arguments & OptionsDescription
nameName of the generator template(s) to copy (see help for list)
--force, -fOverwrite existing copied template files

Usage

If you wanted to customize the page generator template, run the command:

yarn rw setup generator page

And then check web/generators/page for the page, storybook and test template files. You don't need to keep all of these templates—you could customize just page.tsx.template and delete the others and they would still be generated, but using the default Redwood templates.

The only exception to this rule is the scaffold templates. You'll get four directories, assets, components, layouts and pages. If you want to customize any one of the templates in those directories, you will need to keep all the other files inside of that same directory, even if you make no changes besides the one you care about. (This is due to the way the scaffold looks up its template files.) For example, if you wanted to customize only the index page of the scaffold (the one that lists all available records in the database) you would edit web/generators/scaffold/pages/NamesPage.tsx.template and keep the other pages in that directory. You could delete the other three directories (assets, components, layouts) if you don't need to customize them.

Name Variants

Your template will receive the provided name in a number of different variations.

For example, given the name fooBar your template will receive the following variables with the given values

VariableValue
pascalNameFooBar
camelNamefooBar
singularPascalNameFooBar
pluralPascalNameFooBars
singularCamelNamefooBar
pluralCamelNamefooBars
singularParamNamefoo-bar
pluralParamNamefoo-bars
singularConstantNameFOO_BAR
pluralConstantNameFOO_BARS

Example

Copying the cell generator templates:

~/redwood-app$ yarn rw setup generator cell
yarn run v1.22.4
$ /redwood-app/node_modules/.bin/rw setup generator cell
✔ Copying generator templates...
✔ Wrote templates to /web/generators/cell
✨ Done in 2.33s.

setup deploy (config)

Set up a deployment configuration.

yarn redwood setup deploy <provider>
Arguments & OptionsDescription
providerDeploy provider to configure. Choices are aws-serverless, netlify, render, or vercel
--database, -dDatabase deployment for Render only [choices: "none", "postgresql", "sqlite"][default: "postgresql"]
--force, -fOverwrite existing configuration [default: false]

setup deploy netlify

When configuring Netlify deployment, the setup deploy netlify command generates a netlify.toml configuration file with the defaults needed to build and deploy a RedwoodJS site on Netlify.

The netlify.toml file is a configuration file that specifies how Netlify builds and deploys your site — including redirects, branch and context-specific settings, and more.

This configuration file also defines the settings needed for Netlify Dev to detect that your site uses the RedwoodJS framework. Netlify Dev serves your RedwoodJS app as if it runs on the Netlify platform and can serve functions, handle Netlify headers and redirects.

Netlify Dev can also create a tunnel from your local development server that allows you to share and collaborate with others using netlify dev --live.

// See: netlify.toml
// ...
[dev]
# To use [Netlify Dev](https://www.netlify.com/products/dev/),
# install netlify-cli from https://docs.netlify.com/cli/get-started/#installation
# and then use netlify link https://docs.netlify.com/cli/get-started/#link-and-unlink-sites
# to connect your local project to a site already on Netlify
# then run netlify dev and our app will be accessible on the port specified below
framework = "redwoodjs"
# Set targetPort to the [web] side port as defined in redwood.toml
targetPort = 8910
# Point your browser to this port to access your RedwoodJS app
port = 8888

In order to use Netlify Dev you need to:

  • install the latest netlify-cli
  • use netlify link to connect to your Netlify site
  • ensure that the targetPort matches the [web] side port in redwood.toml
  • run netlify dev and your site will be served on the specified port (e.g., 8888)
  • if you wish to share your local server with others, you can run netlify dev --live

Note: To detect the RedwoodJS framework, please use netlify-cli v3.34.0 or greater.

setup tsconfig

Add a tsconfig.json to both the web and api sides so you can start using TypeScript.

yarn redwood setup tsconfig
Arguments & OptionsDescription
--force, -fOverwrite existing files

setup ui

Set up a UI design or style library. Right now the choices are TailwindCSS, Chakra UI, Mantine UI and WindiCSS.

yarn rw setup ui <library>
Arguments & OptionsDescription
libraryLibrary to configure. Choices are chakra-ui, tailwindcss, mantine, and windicss
--force, -fOverwrite existing configuration

storybook

Starts Storybook locally

yarn redwood storybook

Storybook is a tool for UI development that allows you to develop your components in isolation, away from all the conflated cruft of your real app.

"Props in, views out! Make it simple to reason about."

RedwoodJS supports Storybook by creating stories when generating cells, components, layouts and pages. You can then use these to describe how to render that UI component with representative data.

Arguments & OptionsDescription
--openOpen Storybook in your browser on start [default: true]. Pass --no-open to disable this behavior
--buildBuild Storybook
--portWhich port to run Storybook on [default: 7910]

test

Run Jest tests for api and web.

yarn redwood test [side..]
Arguments & OptionsDescription
sides or filterWhich side(s) to test, and/or a regular expression to match against your test files to filter by
--helpShow help
--versionShow version number
--watchRun tests related to changed files based on hg/git (uncommitted files). Specify the name or path to a file to focus on a specific set of tests [default: true]
--watchAllRun all tests
--collectCoverageShow test coverage summary and output info to coverage directory in project root. See this directory for an .html coverage report
--clearCacheDelete the Jest cache directory and exit without running tests
--db-pushSyncs the test database with your Prisma schema without requiring a migration. It creates a test database if it doesn't already exist [default: true]. This flag is ignored if your project doesn't have an api side. 👉 More details.

Note all other flags are passed onto the jest cli. So for example if you wanted to update your snapshots you can pass the -u flag

type-check

Runs a TypeScript compiler check on both the api and the web sides.

yarn redwood type-check [side]
Arguments & OptionsDescription
sideWhich side(s) to run. Choices are api and web. Defaults to api and web

Usage

See Running Type Checks.

serve

Runs a server that serves both the api and the web sides.

yarn redwood serve [side]

You should run yarn rw build before running this command to make sure all the static assets that will be served have been built.

yarn rw serve is useful for debugging locally or for self-hosting—deploying a single server into a serverful environment. Since both the api and the web sides run in the same server, CORS isn't a problem.

Arguments & OptionsDescription
sideWhich side(s) to run. Choices are api and web. Defaults to api and web
--portWhat port should the server run on [default: 8911]
--socketThe socket the server should run. This takes precedence over port

serve api

Runs a server that only serves the api side.

yarn rw serve api

This command uses apiUrl in your redwood.toml. Use this command if you want to run just the api side on a server (e.g. running on Render).

Arguments & OptionsDescription
--portWhat port should the server run on [default: 8911]
--socketThe socket the server should run. This takes precedence over port
--apiRootPathThe root path where your api functions are served

For the full list of Server Configuration settings, see this documentation. If you want to format your log output, you can pipe the command to the Redwood LogFormatter:

yarn rw serve api | yarn rw-log-formatter

serve web

Runs a server that only serves the web side.

yarn rw serve web

This command serves the contents in web/dist. Use this command if you're debugging (e.g. great for debugging prerender) or if you want to run your api and web sides on separate servers, which is often considered a best practice for scalability (since your api side likely has much higher scaling requirements).

But shouldn't I use nginx and/or equivalent technology to serve static files?

Probably, but it can be a challenge to setup when you just want something running quickly!

Arguments & OptionsDescription
--portWhat port should the server run on [default: 8911]
--socketThe socket the server should run. This takes precedence over port
--apiHostForwards requests from the apiUrl (defined in redwood.toml) to the specified host

If you want to format your log output, you can pipe the command to the Redwood LogFormatter:

yarn rw serve web | yarn rw-log-formatter

upgrade

Upgrade all @redwoodjs packages via an interactive CLI.

yarn redwood upgrade

This command does all the heavy-lifting of upgrading to a new release for you.

Besides upgrading to a new stable release, you can use this command to upgrade to either of our unstable releases, canary and rc, or you can upgrade to a specific release version.

A canary release is published to npm every time a PR is merged to the main branch, and when we're getting close to a new release, we publish release candidates.

OptionDescription
--dry-run, -dCheck for outdated packages without upgrading
--tag, -tChoices are "canary", "rc", or a specific version (e.g. "0.19.3"). WARNING: Unstable releases in the case of "canary" and "rc", which will force upgrade packages to the most recent release of the specified tag.

Example

Upgrade to the most recent canary:

yarn redwood upgrade -t canary

Upgrade to a specific version:

yarn redwood upgrade -t 0.19.3